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the guns to avoid a deal for the fiscal cliff. lauren: you're onto something. david: maybe. i don't think they would go for that. "money" with melissa francis is coming next. melissa: i'm melissa francis. here is what is money tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for exports and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing in the way though is president obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags on the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe moreno is here to disagree with me. even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at today's market headlines. mediocrity apparently the reason to buy on wa
cliff." and you, and you slipped and said something else that you won't say, but i just wandered if anybody -- wondered if anybody caught it besides me. >> a lot of people did. [laughter] okay, if you do two shows a day, that's going to happen. and, by the way, i'm not even sure what i said. [laughter] but there are, there is two versions of it. [laughter] there's one that's profane, and then there's one that's really biological. [laughter] so we will just -- you know what? it was such an obvious slip of the tongue -- [laughter] this is the reagan library, people. [laughter] make me sick. [laughter] your minds. >> real quick, we'll go up here on the balcony. >> hi. i and my young boys are a big fan of yours. i have my 13 and 10-year-old watching you every day. >> oh, thanks. where are you? >> i'm up here. >> way -- [laughter] >> oh. great, where? oh. [laughter] >> actually, when i told them i was coming to see you, they wanted to come too. they're big fans. >> oh. so you put them in the closet? [laughter] i mean, that's perfectly fine. you're a terrible mother. [laughter] for com
. don't go over a fiscal cliff." or, you know, "pay our bills," or, "do something about the budget." now, i think even though the people tend to not be open to a lot of different views, they want the people they elect to make government work. >> so, we have created a political system that rewards intransigence. >> we've created a system that says, "we reward incivility. we reward refusal to compromise. we punish people who compromise and are civil and get along well with the people on the other side of the aisle." so, why are we surprised that that's what we get in everything in life? you get what you reward. and you don't get what you punish. and that's what we've done to our political system. >> what's in store for the fate of a democracy that cannot be flexible enough to compromise between its strongly-held prejudices? >> you know, if you have hardening of the arteries, it'll kill you as a person and it'll kill you as a country. what you have to do is to be able to maintain the health of the democracy by saying, "it depends on people of different perspectives to come together, have in
't try to attack what is an overall issue on to something that is happening right now, this fiscal cliff. i don't think that's the way to do it. what i will say, it's been pretty obvious that the war on drugs isn't working. we're still at work. we're not getting anywhere with it. just as where we were in iraq and we weren't getting anywhere. let's get out. so there has to be some change. there has to be some change. in california, we voted. of course, you can have a small amount on you and it's just a misdemeanor, like run ning a stp sign. we also put in a law for medicinal marijuana. i was for it. i've been for it. my mother-in-law died of cancer. she could have used it, for example. at the time, i said, it also gives us an opportunity to do the pilot project of how do you do this? do you collect taxes on it? what's the local regulation? how do you sell it, et cetera? the unfortunate thing of the experience in california is that the federal government has come right in the middle of it. it has gone to landlords and said, listen, if you don't get these additional marijuana places out, we
benefits in terms of the additional uneconomic. >> once you get to the fiscal cliff there is a clear innovation agenda. and the conditions we will have as a result of the fiscal cliffs did get out that. the first one will be immigration. we agreed and a lot of people say how are we going to compete with china and we can have the entire world at our disposal. under which the best people in the world can come to the u.s. and start businesses. >> then we have to focus on a special in the corporate tax reform to get the system which is simpler and promotes efficiency and these are for american businesses. then we have to and that will -- efficiency will be enormous. the next is an infrastructure investment to be made. in the context of the budget deal we are getting where we will spend less going forward. we have to think about what our values are and the most important things we can spend money are on infrastructure to make investments in the future rather than have short-term spending. and twin that with support for research, basic research and higher education and for education. if go
't have a lot of leverage. if they do nothing, if no law passes, they go over the fiscal cliff. >> that raises the issue. you are talking what a disaster the medicare eligibility portion of this would be, do you look at the compromise of 37%, if you could get something more favorable on medicare, would you say going up to 37% instead of 39.6 is enough? >> no. look, there was a tax plan and we looked at the discussion of keeping the rates at the level and reforming the tax code and dealing with deductions. the truth is, if you want to have significant deficit reduction, which republicans are arguing for and you want to stabilize the debt, we need significant revenue. we need to -- the real challenge we have is we are not raising revenue. it's at the lowest levels it's been in decades. the fairest and best way to do that is move from 35 to 39.6%. go back to the clinton levels. we have this level in 2000, from '93 to 2000. we had great growth. we looked at the issue. we have bob on our plan. the reason we have that is because we recognize this argument republicans have made, which
this fiscal cliff thing obviously everybody's talking about oh we've gotta cut the entitlements like medicare. you've been pointing out something for awhile that we don't have a medicare problem. we have a healthcare cost problem. explain please, healthcare geek. >> this is one of the things people should really pay attention to because the healthcare crisis in this country gets so complicate and convoluted that people tune it out and then the republicans have this incredible opportunity to swoop in and make stuff up. we don't have a medicare problem. we have a healthcare cost problem. there is no competition in the healthcare market place right now. >> stephanie: right. >> okay. and people make money in the healthcare industry when prices go up. >> right. >> corporations make money when prices go up. we're talking about medical device manufacturers, drug companies, health insurance companies, they all make money the higher the prices are. they have no incentive to work for the public good. their incent sieve t
's on all of our minds here, the fiscal cliff. and i would be remiss if i didn't ask you both to weigh in on it. but in the following way, number one, what's going on that we don't understand? number two, what should happen? number three, what's the r.s.c. going to do to help us get to that better state of what should happen? either one of you wants to chime in on that one? >> first of all, you know, if you look at where we are right now, it's because of a number of reasons. jim touched on a few of them, going back to the debt ceiling deal. i did not vote for the budget control act. to me it didn't address the real problem and that's spending. if you look at the debate right now, it's mostly about the debate of how much faxes we need to raise. the president keeps adding more to it because he has an insatiablet appetite to add more. we are not addressing the real problem. i don't think anybody's taxes need to go up. you look at what barack obama said three years ago. if you raise taxes in a bad economy it will make things worse. we're still in a bad economy. why would we want to do thin
today. it's over. why inject the politics? why go there? with so much going on, the fiscal cliff, negotiating back and forth with the house trying to figure out how to avoid massive tax increases and spending cuts, why there? it's all politics. >> steve: one other note, the "wall street journal" says regarding right to work states, between 2000 and 2010, 5 million people moved from union states to right to work states and they have 23% higher rate of income growth per capita in right to work states. so things are thriving in the right to work states. there are 24 of them. 26 still are union states. >> gretchen: eric brought up an interesting point about why isn't the president staying in washington, because now it turns out that the fiscal cliff is actually closer than we thought. it was not coakley january 1 anymore. we've about to go off it any day now because apparently it takes a certain amount of days to actually draft any kind of legislation that they might come to an agreement on and so if you backtrack then from the end of the year and when congress is going to be going h
. caller: hi. i have two questions concerning the fiscal cliff. the cash cuts that republicans -- the spending cuts on medicare. why don't we allow them to negotiate medicare and to reduce the cost of medicine? that should save you a lot of money yearly. i agree totally about the republicans and democrats spending money stupidly just before the election. both sides voted to refurbish something like 170 army tanks that the army said they'd do not need. they went and voted to repair those tanks. why are we wasting our money? democrats want to cut taxes. host: armstrong williams? guest: we haven't gotten to affordable care and medicare and medicaid. if affordable care was administered correctly and if he did not have the special interest groups and if tort reform was not included, package you move forward in making health care work for anyone if you do not bring tort reform to the table? the medical malpractice lawsuits are out of control where doctors are paranoid and have to think twice before going through these procedures. it becomes a nightmare for doctors. there are too many
in the world. we on the bridge of -- before it talk about fiscal, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff that created a scenario that led to this ridiculous idea that i voted against. let's put a bunch of bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. we have to avoid doing damage. avoid doing harm. we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. and then we have to have a conversation but getting the fiscal house in order. it's fundamentally true. we spend a trillion dollars a year more than we taken. we have to address it. i approach this issue with the belief the only way with me that in order is to rapid economic order. what the president is proposing does not raise enough revenue to make a significant dent in the debt, but it will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class. that's why i oppose this plan. i think we should do real tax reform. there are loopholes. there's one for being able to write off your yacht as second home. let's go after things like that, but not as a revenue generating mechanism. the way is to r
on the fiscal cliff, we cannot lose sight of their urgent priority of making sure we have job growth -- job creation, to say the least. many of the components you have outlined -- that both of you have -- it comprised of the broad description of the fiscal cliff whether it is the expiring tax cut provisions, the expiring tax cut extensions, and spending cuts as well. if you consider more, which of those would you consider having the biggest bang for the buck in terms of economic impact of those that we are discussing here today? >> it is a given that we will extend the current tax rates for taxpayers that make less than $250,000 on an annual basis. that is absolutely necessary. when you consider the other things that are happening -- in terms of the bang for the buck, the emergency unemployment insurance program is very effective. it is small in the grand scheme of things. cbo is estimating it would costs per calendar year about $33 million. but the economic opportunity for job growth compared to the unemployment rate would be measurably more than that. we are down to go to million people i
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)